What to Do After the Eclipse

What to Do After the Eclipse

The eclipse has come with much fanfare and now it’s over. We’ve invested so much eager anticipation, hard work and excitement into seeing this one that now we’re left wondering what to do next. Here are some ideas:

  1. Process and upload your images. They can go on our Forum, on our Facebook page, in our 2018 calendar and to our Communications Officer, Paul, for use on our website in the future. Also, Dawn is collecting images for a slide show for our September general meeting.

  2. Donate your undamaged solar glasses. At the September meeting, we’ll have a large box to collect used solar glasses. We’ll send them to our friends at Astronomers Without Borders who will donate them to schools and clubs in South American for the 2019 eclipse going over Chile and Argentina.

Image by RCA Member Michael McKeag

Read More

2017 Eclipse Detroit Lake Citizen Science

The eclipse was incredible! At the present, I am still getting the data logged into this short eclipse report.  We rated ourselves in the 95 percentile for statistical efficiency on the performance of the team and the instruments.  Some of the gear was not perfected until two hours before totality! Besides our highly efficient team, we also had a Canadian theorist and European Space Agency and Jodrell Bank Radio Telescope researchers helping us. In all, there were about fourteen people assisting us. All five radio telescopes used performed well at CATE site number three, the LEOS, Hercules II and the ICOM, in the UHF, c band, and s band collected data.

Read More

Our Great American Eclipse Alaska Airlines Flight

Our Great American Eclipse Alaska Airlines Flight

by RCA Member Teela Bright
The day started out early as I woke up around 3:00 am, thinking of my incredible luck in having my name drawn by RCA for such a spectacular event — reviewing in my mind the smiles and amazing support I have had from RCA, knowing in my heart that they would all be with me during this flight, and then some — and knowing I have been blessed with perhaps a once-in-a-lifetime chance to see something so amazing and beautiful.

Read More

Thanks to Our RCA Volunteers at OMSI Total Solar Eclipse Viewing Party, Salem

Thanks to Our RCA Volunteers at OMSI Total Solar Eclipse Viewing Party, Salem

RCA Volunteers shared their time, telescopes and knowledge with over 1,000 people at the OMSI viewing party for the total eclipse in Salem, OR on August 21. Volunteers showed up Saturday afternoon to help set up and many slept overnight in the gravel lot of the Oregon State Fair Grounds to be ready for Monday’s early morning. With 14 wonderful volunteers, there were many activities to engage the attendees of the event. There were 7 telescopes set up for public viewing of the sun and Venus. There was also an eclipse diagram provided by Robin Baker, an RCA astro-photography display and an Oregon roadmap showing path of totality by Paul Salvatore. Lastly, there were activities for kids of all ages that included UV bead bracelets, moon phase wheels, and solar eclipse word searches.

Many thanks to Robin Baker, Paula Frenchen, Yara Green, Bob Hansen (from sister club in Vancouver, BC), Robert Nelson and family, Mario and Maria Pedraza, Marc Singleton, April South, Mike Sutherland, and Do and Uyen Tran for their enthusiasm and generosity on such a spectacular occasion.

Read More

The Joys of a Global Eclipse: British Deaf Astronomical Association

The Joys of a Global Eclipse: British Deaf Astronomical Association

It was billed as the “great American” eclipse, but I’d rather call it the “great global eclipse.” One of my pleasures on Eclipse Day was meeting Graham and Margaret Duhig, members of BDAA, the British Deaf Astronomical Association. I spent the night before the eclipse at a small hotel downtown so I would wake up in the morning close to the train station. When I checked in, I noticed a senior couple signing to each other. The next day as I checked out at 5:15 a.m., the hotel clerk told me I had just missed sharing a taxi with the English astronomers who were here to see the eclipse. When I got to the train station, they were there, so I introduced myself and gave them a card from RCA. They showed me a picture of their group and gave me their contact information. We shared a train ride down and they set up near the capitol steps for the event. There’s more to the story, but I’ll end it by saying I encourage you to visit their website and friend or like them on Facebook.

Read More

We’re All One under the Sun!

We’re All One under the Sun!

I had the pleasure of welcoming the Hardel family (Suzelle, Stephane and their teen daughters, Dilys and Maelle) of Normandy, France to Oregon for the Total Solar Eclipse (TSE). Having little interest in astronomy at the time, they were visiting Spain during the 1999 eclipse that went through France. Like so many members of our club, Suzelle, a member of two Norman astronomy clubs, was lured into astronomy in 2007 when her long-time photography hobby blossomed into astrophotography. By March, when Suzelle was finally granted leave for an extended holiday to the USA, all accommodations along the Path of Totality from Oregon to Idaho were booked. So, she reached out to fellow astronomy clubs in both states asking for advice on accommodation. Having been unexpectedly shut out from OSP, I found myself in the same situation, i.e., all dressed up and nowhere to go. So I immediately extended her an invite to my little house in Portland, while warning her that there could be clouds west of the Cascades.

Read More

The Unpredictable Total Eclipse of the Sun

The Unpredictable Total Eclipse of the Sun

The morning of July 11, 1991 our family packed up into the car and headed down the road to find a clear spot from which to view one of the longest total eclipses of the sun. It was on a rural road on the big island of Hawaii and fortunately there was little traffic. After fitting everyone with solar viewing glasses and setting up my tripod holding both my still camera and video camera, the partial eclipse was well under way. However, more clouds were starting to move in from the direction of the centerline path of the eclipse. I panicked and with difficulty herded grumpy kids and all back into the car and drove further down the road to get away from the clouds.

Read More

Camping reservations open for eclipse viewing at Oregon State Parks

Camping reservations open for eclipse viewing at Oregon State Parks

Salem OR — Starting November 17, 2016, state park campers can make reservations for campsites, yurts, and cabins to enjoy the August 21, 2017 total solar eclipse. The normal advance campsite reservation window opens nine months before the first night of a visitor's stay, but a temporary change to the reservation system will affect people who want to make a 14-night reservation, the maximum allowed in Oregon's State Park system.

Read More

August 2017 Eclipse Page

August 2017 Eclipse Page

A total solar eclipse refers to the sun being completely covered by the moon during the day. During this time, the sky momentarily darkens, temperatures fall, and daytime becomes nighttime. Total solar eclipses are rare: Any particular location on earth only sees a total solar eclipse about once every 300 years. The path on the Earth within which the total solar eclipse is visible is called the path of totality. On August 21, 2017, the path of totality over land will stretch from Oregon to South Carolina.

Read More